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Showing posts sorted by relevance for query egg. Sort by date Show all posts

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Tissue Paper and Twine Egg Tutorial

Thank You:




for featuring my egg! 

Tissue Twine SIde
Last year “BB” ( before blogging) I made some Easter eggs covered with scrapbook paper and Mod Podge. True to my deal hunting ways, I picked up several more of the eggs I used after Easter when they were on sale for $.49. Michaels has them again this year and even at regular price they’re $.99:
IMG_5288
I had an idea in my head ( uh-oh) that I wasn’t sure would work but I figured the most I was out was $.49…not a big price to pay. I slapped some Mod Podge on the egg and then smooshed some torn tissue paper on. Continue the slap and smoosh. The tissue drinks up the Mod Podge and it’s really easy to blend the edges so you don’t have seams. Better if you tear your tissue. Just regular old tissue that some stores give you way too much of and you don’t throw it away tissue.
Tissue Paper Egg
For this one I only covered the top half of the egg because the plan was to cover the bottom half with twine. Once this was dry, I painted it with acrylic craft paint in a robins egg blue and then dry brushed it with white and taupe. After that was dry I started in the middle with a dab of hot glue and started wrapping the rest of the egg in cotton twine. That took the longest but it’s pretty self explanatory.
Twine Wrapped Egg
To finish, I tore a strip of muslin, wrapped around the middle and tied a dragonfly charm to the knot with more twine. I added Prima paper flowers, a button, and a self adhesive rhinestone.
Tissue Twine Flower
I made a second egg using the same process only this time I covered the whole egg with tissue. I went around the middle of this one with a K&Co scrapbook border ( Flora and Fauna) , a strip of muslin, another brass charm, and small paper flowers ( Kaiser Scrapbook) and coordinating rhinestones:
Tissue Flower Bowl
Here are both of them in an alabaster footed bowl ( cobbled together from Salvation Army finds) :
Tissue, Twine, Bowl (2)
I’m “egg-static” with the outcome!
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Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Pottery Barn Inspired Easter Egg

I hate it when I start to question my sanity. Like when I assume that something I see at PB will be on their website and it isn’t and then I start thinking well maybe that’s not where I saw it! I  know I saw some floral eggs at PB last week. I was short on time so I just figured they’d be on their website and I could take a closer look. Well no. But I wanted to make them! (insert big stamping foot pout here).  Here’s my take on a “I Know I Saw This @ Pottery Barn  / Don’t Have A Picture to Show You Egg”:

Pottery Barn Inspired Egg (3)
I started with a package of styrofoam eggs from Michaels. $4.49 before 40% for a package of 4.
Pottery Barn Inspired Egg (2)
And a stem of these silk cherry blossom things for $1.49
Pottery Barn Inspired Egg
Other materials, straight pins and a ginormous bag of “pearls” from my bead stash.
I inserted a screw eye into the top of the egg. Then I popped one of the blossoms (they’re two layers each) off of the stem and threaded it onto a straight pin with a pearl and stuck it into the egg. Went around the whole egg until it was covered and threaded a coordinating ribbon through the screw eye.
Pottery Barn Inspired Egg (5)
Pottery Barn Inspired Egg (6)
So the next time I’m in PB I will remember to sneak  pics on my phone! And even though I don’t remember how much PB wanted, I know it was more than the $1.86 my egg cost me to make!
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Sunday, March 17, 2013

Vintagey "Chocolate" and Rose Egg

Faux Vintage Chocolate Egg

Of course it’s no secret that I love chocolate, and this time of year, chocolate eggs abound. This one is not edible but still delicious I think!

For this project you will need:
  • 6” plastic egg
  • Tissue paper ( not fancy, whatever comes in a bag when you buy something at the store)
  • Mod Podge
  • Acrylic craft paints ( I used a dark umber and Martha Stewart Glitter paint in “Brownstone”
  • Embellishments ( I used a scrapbook border by K&Co )
Plastic Egg

I first shared this technique in this post: Twine and Tissue Paper Egg. Tear your tissue paper into small pieces, apply to your egg using Mod Podge. Cover all over and let dry. Then paint with you choice of colors.
Martha Stewart Brownstone Glitter Paint

I like the unevenness and texture of the tissue paper. I applied one coat of the plain acrylic paint and three of the glitter paint.

Once my paint was dry, I applied a decorative scrapbook border and sealed it with some more Mod Podge.

Chocolate Rose Egg

I had some paper roses in my embellishment stash and decided to hot glue those to the top of my egg at an angle.
Crepe Paper Grass
While I was waiting for my Mod Podged border to dry, I  cut a length of  crepe paper streamer ( a roll from the $1 goes a long way!), folded it in half then in half again and cut strips of it and plopped them in an ice cream dish I found at Crate and Barrel for $1.95.

Vintage Chocolate Egg

Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Fall Decor: Make Fall Acorns and Pinecones from Plastic Easter Eggs

 


While Halloween hasn't even arrived yet, I think my house is sufficiently haunted so I've started in on some Fall decorations for November. I'm so excited about how these came out and I hope you like them! 

I've always loved acorns for no reason that I can put my finger on. I just think they scream Fall. Growing up in the Pacific Northwest, pinecones were literally everywhere. Now living in the desert, I don't have either so I did what Makers do and made my own versions! 

Supplies: 
  • Plastic Easter Eggs (had some in my craft stash)
  • Acrylic Paints ( I used Craftsmart Dark Brown and Martha Stewart Rust Metallic)
  • Scrapbook Paper ( Pinecones)
  • Jute Cord
  • Coordinating Sequins (I love the Kids Craft section at Michaels) 
  • Copper Beads
  • Glue Gun and Hot Glue 
  • Aleene's Turbo Tacky Glue


I wasn't sure how well the paint was going to stick to the plastic so I coated a couple with Mod Podge to increase the adhesion and then I decided to try directly on the egg which worked fine. It was easier to open the eggs to paint vs paint them whole. 



I used a bamboo skewer to help hold the eggs in place as I painted. I started with a coat of the plain brown paint and then went over that with a couple of coats of the metallic rust. I made some "egg holders" from scraps of paper glued together in a circle. 


I'm a "figure it out as I go along" person so initially I didn't think I needed to paint the tops of the eggs since they would be covered with sequins but after I could still see a little of the color when I did the first one, I decided to do that w/ the rest. 

Once your egg is completely painted ( you can see here I reached my decision to paint the tops after I'd already added the twine to one, so it's shown here w/out paint) then add a drop of hot glue on the seam, wrap around the egg as shown and when satisfied, glue then trim the end. 


For the acorn stems, I just folded some of the jute twine over itself 2 or three times and sealed the ends w/ a dab of hot glue and then glued to the middle of the top of the egg. Then, using the Tacky Glue, start gluing the sequins around the egg, starting at the top edge of the twine. Work up to the top and voila!



I had some copper beads in my stash so I added on sequin to the bottom along with one copper bead. 

Pinecones:
For the pinecones you will need an oval craft punch or a digital cutting machine. I used my Cricut Explore 2 and created an oval shape in Design Space for my pine cone parts. 


I had some silver polka dot foiled kraft papers in my stash and I liked the way I thought they'd look with the acorns so to coordinate, I used silver sequins around the small end of the egg. Starting around the sequins, start gluing the ovals around the egg. I did use the hot glue for this. Continue until you get to the top of the egg, slightly offsetting each row of petals. Once you get to the other end, decide if you want them more open or closed and glue the petals down accordingly. 





I hope you've found some inspiration! 



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